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The stories always begin the same way: a seemingly innocuous photograph of an official at a public event is shared online. But savvy web users ignore the event in question, and focus instead on what they are wearing on their wrist.
Intelligence agencies' secretive techniques for spying on mobile phones are seldom made public. But a UK security firm has shown the BBC how one tool, sold around the world to spooks, actually works...
India will restore free access to 857 pornographic websites, following widespread outrage over the move. The department of telecom told internet service providers not to disable URLs that "do not have child pornographic content", the PTI agency reported...
Natalia Molchanova, the 53-year-old Russian champion freediver, is feared dead after going missing on Sunday. Ms Molchanova, who holds 41 world records, was diving for fun off Formentera, a Spanish island near Ibiza, when she failed to surface.
US scientists say they have solved the riddle of why a collection of balancing rocks near the San Andreas fault has never been toppled by earthquakes.
I was 12 years old when Spock died. Like everyone else in the cinema that had grown up with Star Trek, it was a shocking moment. Even today, the scene at the end of the Wrath of Khan remains poignant.
Zach Conrad died on a lovely Sunday afternoon in Philadelphia. It was 3 June 2012, and the 36-year-old financial analyst had decided to take a solo bike ride, as he often did on weekends. As the ride progressed, however, Conrad sensed that something was wrong.
Delta and American Airlines have banned the shipment of big-game trophies on flights after the illegal killing of Cecil the lion in Zimbabwe. The airlines announced that they would no longer transport lion, rhinoceros, leopard, elephant or buffalo remains.
The gruesome sight features in literature and horror films, but is it true? To find out, we need to look into the world of organ transplants. Your hearts stops, your blood goes cold and your limbs stiffen.
In 2011, Mr A, a 57-year-old social worker from England, was admitted to Southampton General Hospital after collapsing at work. Medical personnel were in the middle of inserting a catheter into his groin when he went into cardiac arrest. With oxygen cut off, his brain immediately flat-lined.
"There is no danger that Titanic will sink. The boat is unsinkable and nothing but inconvenience will be suffered by the passengers." Phillip Franklin, White Star Line vice-president, 1912Words that have gone down in history, for all the wrong reasons...
Perhaps the world's oldest message in a bottle, cast into the sea near Germany 101 years ago, has been presented to the sender's granddaughter, it's been reported. Last month, fishermen in the Baltic Sea pulled an old beer bottle out of the water, along with their catch...
Marooned on an island, if you threw a message-in-a-bottle into the ocean, would you be saved? The answer, according to researchers, depends on where you are. This interactive map shows how floating objects dropped into the ocean travel over the years.
We know more about the surface of Mars than we do the mantle of the planet we live on.
It is hard to read about surgery over the centuries without flinching: the crudity of the tools, the lack of anaesthetic, and not least what seems like astonishing guts (metaphorically speaking) in carrying out techniques that nowadays seem indistinguishable from butchery.
A ganglion cyst is one of those bumps you sometimes see on people’s wrist. They start off small, but can grow to the size of a golf ball. Watching a lump grow larger is unnerving, but the good news is they are harmless and they don’t become cancerous.
Grady Nelson had his life spared by a brain scan. In January 2005, after he was released from a Florida prison, where he had served time for the rape of his step-daughter, he returned home to stab his wife 60 times, slash her throat and slam a butcher’s knife into her head.
Some people crack their knuckles by pulling the tip of each finger one at a time until they hear a crack. Others make a tight fist or bend their fingers backwards away from the hand, cracking the lot at once.
Beware the scaremongers. Like a witch doctor’s spell, their words might be spreading modern plagues. We have long known that expectations of a malady can be as dangerous as a virus.

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